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Thread: Musical Musings

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    Default Musical Musings

    A couple of weeks ago, there was a thread where a couple of people made tangential comments intimating that playing MMOs was seen as something shameful or embarassing. My response to that was that we should be promoting it as something normal and well-adjusted people do as a hobby, so that wider society, seeing people playing MMOs, will have the opportunity to reconsider their prejudices.

    Obviously, from the thread title, I'm not going to talk about DDO (not to mention the fact that it wouldn't make sense to post on the DDO forums admitting that I play DDO...).

    Hi, my name is Thalone, and I listen to art music. Music colloquially known as "classical."

    "But Thalone," you say, "that music is for elitist old white snobs!" Not so. I go to the symphony quite often, and there are people of all shapes, sizes, colours, ages, and formality of dress. To be honest, it's mostly a grey-haired crowd, but no one will look down on you no matter your age or attire. I am not aware of any orchestra or classical organisation that has a dress code to attend events: show up in jeans if you want. Everyone's happy to see a full hall.

    "Classical music is expensive." Well, in my experience, it's a comparable price to pop music tickets or sporting events. And it's often better bang for your buck than sports--while both have intermissions, a concert doesn't have to constantly contend with breaks in play for referee calls or for the other team to "take its turn." Many orchestras also offer last-minute discount tickets for students (often called "Live Rush" or "Student Rush" tickets) or "young professionals."

    "It's music 100s of years old played the same way every time. It's antiseptic and devoid of feeling. It's boring." Well sure, some classical music is boring, to some people, some of the time. But I'm sure you could find examples of boring in every genre, even your favourite. Art music reaches back beyond Bach in the mid-1600s to modern composers living today. Collectively, it expresses the full spectrum of human emotions--just like pop music. And while the musicians have to perform the notes as written, there is enough freedom with tempo, volume, and accents within repeated themes within the same piece that give an art music tune lots of personality. And that's within the same piece--different works contrast even more, providing such variety.

    "But I have no musical education and won't understand it." Now that's just silly. If you don't need an education to listen to pop music, you don't need one to listen to classical. The only musical schooling I had was through high school band (this one time, at band camp...), and it was not very structured. I have no idea what a diminished fifth is, but my lack of technical knowledge does not for a moment impede my enjoyment of a particular piece. Does the fact that you don't know how DDO is coded prevent you from having a good dungeon stomp?

    So, I don't know how much interest there will be in discussing or sharing art music. I'll add posts linking to YouTube tracks intermittently of stuff I like, with a little commentary. If it seems there's no interest, I'll just let the thread die, satisfied that at least I did something to help clear up misconceptions about one of my hobbies.

    Well if you've made it this far, have a listen to Steve Reich's Duet. It's scored for two violins, which, as near as my layperson's ear can tell, play the essentially the same melody slightly out of phase. It creates a fascinating echo effect. A string orchestra plays a very simple accompaniment under the violin leads as they chase each other. It's just a five-minute piece, but there's a lot happening.



    I don't know a lot about Reich, as he's a modern composer and I'm more interested in stuff from the Baroque to Romantic eras. I've only ever encountered two of Reich's pieces; one involving a chamber ensemble and prerecorded train sounds (I think?), which I absolutely hated. Duet is the other, and I absolutely love it.
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    We shouldnt have to defend the music that touches us. It is unfortunate that classical music comes with a stigma. I feel like all music does and it is up to us the listener to hopefully connect in someway. Great post.
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    Thanks for the comment, Edsan. While I listen mostly to "classical" stuff, I'm very interested in World and Jazz styles as well, and grew up listening to stations which played popular music. Like you say, all music can touch us; we just have to give it a chance.

    And so back to posting clips...

    Last week I linked a modern work. Today, I'm going to post something quintessentially Romantic: Brahms' Violin Sonata #1 (often called the "Rain" sonata). Brahms wrote three sonatas for violin. The first movement of the first sonata is my favourite.

    One of the things I really like about art music is the really long lines or arcs. This movement introduces its main musical idea almost immediately, and Brahms plays with it, each mutation of the melody flowing effortlessly and seamlessly into the next, until we come full circle about six minutes later, where he does a little recap to take us to the end. To my ears, Brahms conveys shyness, confidence, playfulness, nostalgia, and anger all within the same 10-minute piece. Quite the story here, even if there are no words.

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    Well, with the servers down this morning on a day off (I know how Brits feel about bank holidays now...), I spent most of the morning music shopping.

    La Pieta is a string ensemble that does a wide variety of stuff... from usual art music fare to arrangements of music from film scores (I see Schindler's List and Princess Mononoke, among others) to an album of video game music (Assassin's Creed, Final Fantasy, Halo, Angry Birds).

    On the album I purchased was a piece composed in the early 2000s (I think?) by François Dompierre, "Les Beautés du diable" (The Devil's Beauties). The interesting thing about this track is that the accompaniment in the strings is completely plucked (pizzicato) rather than bowed. It's by no means rare to find pizzicato in classical-style pieces, but I find it difficult to think of examples where it's extended over long periods or for entire pieces.

    In this music, one can definitely imagine Arraetrikos overseeing his army of enslaved scullery maids, who tiptoe in the shadows in a vain attempt to avoid his eye.



    It dawned on me while watching this clip on YouTube that it was a music video. A classical music video. Kind of weird that the YouTube sidebar for this video has selection from Katy Perry and Avril Lavigne...
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    I'm sure there are lots of Star Wars fans on these boards... with the new film project announced, it's been on my mind lately.

    John Williams composed music for all six films so far (he's prolific; his stuff includes E.T., Jaws, Indiana Jones, etc). I quite enjoy the original trilogy and watch them on my old VHS tapes (anyone remember VHS!) once in a while. People call Star Wars space opera, and it's an apt term. The music in the series often feels like an extra character on the screen.

    Williams wrote a lot of music for the original trilogy that, for whatever reason, never ended up on the screen. A lot of the tunes are in the form of "Concert Suites," short, self-contained works. My favourite among these is the "Luke and Leia" suite. The wind instruments are very evocative of nightbirds or insects, and some of the higher, shimmering string accompaniment feels like wind wending its way through the leaves.



    The scene I think of when hearing this music is near the end of Jedi, when Luke and Leia are in the forest of Endor, when Luke tells Leia about the terrible secret of their shared heritage. The slightest snippet of the suite can be heard as Luke departs. I can see why more of the suite isn't used in the scene--overall the music is so bright and hopeful, whereas the scene is tense; the twins cycling between apprehension, revulsion, outright fear, and resolve. A bigger extract is played over the end credits.
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    Last week, space opera... a natural segue is to "real" opera. And of course if we're going to talk opera, it would be silly to not at least touch on Bizet's Carmen, which is reportedly the most popular opera in the world today. (Strangely, this was not the case in Bizet's time. It was considered unimpressive, and Bizet never lived to see his masterpiece become accepted as it is today.)

    And it's rightly popular. Everyone knows the Toreador song, the Habanera, numerous famous snippets from use in popular culture or advertising. But the entire work is replete with memorable tunes. I've seen it live twice and on the Met Opera theatre broadcasts once or twice (incidentally, I believe they'll be showing Carmen again next year), and listened to recordings dozens, if not hundreds of times. I never get tired of hearing it.

    The context of this scene (somehow I've managed to select one where the titular character does not appear!): Carmen, a gypsy girl, has just thrown an enchanted flower at Don José, a soldier, to ensnare his heart. Michaëla, a girl from José's village, shows up with a letter and gifts from his mother. The two reminisce about life in the village. The coy thing about this scene is that José and his mother use Michaëla as an intermediary to pass mother-son kisses. Poor girl... While the the majority of the passage is bright and sweet, José's short aside in the middle foreshadows the tragedy to follow.



    Translation courtesy of http://www.aria-database.com.

    Code:
    José:  Micaëla!					 	Micaëla!	
    
    Micaëla:  C'est votre mère qui m'envoie.		It's your mother who sends me.
    
    José:  Ma mère... !					My mother!
    
    #6  Duet
    
    JOSÉ
    Parle-moi de ma mère !					Tell me about my mother !
    
    MICAËLA
    J'apporte de sa part, fidèle messagère, cette lettre.	I carry from her, faithful messenger, this letter.
    
    JOSÉ:
    Une lettre!						A  letter !
    
    MICAËLA
    Et puis un peu d'argent					And then a little money
    Pour ajouter ?* votre traitement,  et puis...		to add to your  wage,  and then...
    
    DON JOSÉ
    Et puis?						And then?
    
    MICAËLA
    Et puis -- vraiment,  je n'ose --			And then -- really, I don't dare--
    et puis encore une autre chose				And then  yet  another  thing
    qui vaut mieux que l'argent				which is worth more than money
    et qui pour un bon fils,				and which for a good son,
    aura sans doute plus de prix.				has without doubt greater value.
    
    DON JOSÉ		
    Cette autre chose, quelle est-elle?			This other thing, what is it?
    Parle donc.						Speak, then.
    
    MICAËLA
    Oui, je parlerai.  Ce que l'on m'a donné		Yes, I will speak.   What was given to me
    Je vous le donnerai.					I will give it to you.
    Votre mère avec moi sortait de la chapelle,	    	Your mother with me was coming out of the chapel,
    et c'est alors qu'en m'embrassant:		 	And it was then that while embrassing me:
    "Tu vas,"  m'a-t-elle dit, "t'en aller ?* la ville;	"You're going," she said to me, "to go to the city;
    la route n'est pas longue, une fois ?* Séville.		The route  isn't long, once in Seville.
    Tu chercheras mon fils, mon José, mon enfant.		You will search for my son, my José, my child.
    Et tu lui diras que sa mère				And you will say to him that his mother
    Songe nuit et jour ?*  l'absent,				Dreams night and day about the absent one,
    Et qu'elle regrette et qu'elle espère,			And that she regrets and that she hopes,
    qu'elle pardonne et qu'elle attend;			that she forgives and that she waits;
    tout cela, n'est-ce pas, mignonne,			all this,  isn't that so, dear one,
    de ma part, tu le lui diras;				on my behalf, you will tell it to him;
    et ce baiser que je te donne				and this kiss which I give you
    de ma part, tu le lui rendras."				on my  behalf, you will give it to him. "
    
    DON JOSÉ
    Un baisser de ma mère!					A kiss from my mother!
    
    MICAËLA
    Un baiser pour son fils!				A  kiss for her son!
    José, je vous le rends, comme je l'ai promis.		José. I give it to you, as I  have promised.  
    
    DON JOSÉ
    Ma mère, je la vois!  Oui, je revois mon village!  	My mother, I see her!  I see again my village!
    O souvenirs d'autrefois, 				O memories of other times,
    doux souvenirs du pays!					Sweet memories of my birthplace!
    O souvenirs chéris!					Oh dear memories!
    Vous remplissez mon coeur de force et de courage.	You fill my heart with strength and with courage.
    
    MICAËLA  (duet with Don Jose)		
    Sa mère, il la revoit!   Il revoit son village!		His mother, he sees her again, he sees again his village!
    O, souvenirs d'autrefois! Souvenirs du pays!           	O memories of other times!  Memories of his birthplace!
    Vous remplissez son coeur de force et de courage!  	You fill his heart with strength and with courage.
    I truly could've posted most anything from the opera and it would've been equally lovely (I'm quite fond of the chorus work in Act 2), but duet sequences in this scene are magnificent in how the vocalists and the orchestra support each other.
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    I thought it would be a good idea to follow the opera excerpt last week with a smaller scale vocal work. While today's popular music is dominated by vocal music (with instrumental support), with what I've posted so far, this clearly was not the case for music in the centuries before, or for "art music" today. That being said, composers of old wrote many standalone songs.

    Probably most everyone knows a bit of Tchaikovsky, if nothing other than his famous ballet scores for The Nutcracker or Swan Lake. He lived a dreadfully depressing life due to his sexuality and the restrictive mores of his time, and you can hear his sadness in his compositions. There's often a thread of melancholy in his music, or an impression of an implacable or unstoppable fate. I've selected here his "Amidst the Din of the Ball," a short work I've heard sung by both men and women. There were a lot of good female versions floating around on YouTube, but I first heard it sung by a male voice, and first impressions being what they are, it seems more natural to my ear.



    Translation courtesy of recmusic.org.

    In the midst of the noisy ball,
    amid the anxious bustle of life,
    I caught sight of you,
    your face, an enigma.

    Only your eyes gazed sadly.
    Your divine voice
    Sounded like pipes from afar,
    Like the dancing waves of the sea.

    Your delicate form entranced me,
    and your pensiveness,
    your sad yet merry laughter,
    has permeated my heart since then.

    And in the lonely hours of the night,
    when I do lie down to rest,
    I see your pensive eyes,
    hear your merry laugh...

    And wist-fully drifting
    into mysterious reveries,
    I wonder if I love you,
    but it seems that I do!
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    Well the Tchaikovsky was pretty short so I'll post a second. Richard Strauss (some of his music was repurposed for the theme of 2001: A Space Odyssey) was a German whose life spanned the 19th and 20th centuries. "Morgen!" (Tomorrow!) is usually performed by soprano and orchestra, but here is arranged for piano and voice (this was apparently the way Strauss had it originally). I like this performance for the clarity of Barbara Bonney's voice and the excellent balance between the voice and piano.

    One doesn't usually think of German as a gentle language, but it certainly seems that way in this song!



    Translation courtesy of the video poster:

    And to-morrow the sun will shine again
    And on the path that I shall take
    It will re-unite us, the blessed ones,
    In the midst of this world that breathes in the sun...

    And to the broad shore, lapped by blue waves,
    We shall quietly and slowly climb down,
    Silently we shall look into each other's eyes
    While upon us descends the silence of true bliss...
    Last edited by Thalone; 03-27-2015 at 10:23 PM. Reason: replaced dead link
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    After a couple of songs last week with piano accompaniment, I thought it would be nice to have some solo piano music this week. There's no shortage of composers who've written for solo piano; many of my favourite composers wrote music for keyboard. (It's a fascinating exercise to listen to Beethoven's 32 piano sonatas, spanning over 10 hours of music; you can literally hear his style evolve from that of a young composer under Haydn's tutelage to a voice uniquely his own). I've been listening to a lot of Schubert lately; many of his piano pieces are easy on the ears.

    Schubert's last piano sonata is a gargantuan work; depending on the performer, it can take 40 or 50 minutes to play. The first two movements are quite introspective, so to contrast with last week's selections, I'll post the third movement, which is very sprightly. I think the melody passes between the lower and higher voices (Schubert is indelibly linked to song in my mind, even in his instrumental works) very neatly. I'm very envious of professional pianists; their muscle control is so far beyond what I could ever attain. This video, I think, is a good example of that. Brendel. Just by varying the force on each key and the connectedness of consecutive notes, the music is imbued with so many different moods: it bubbles, it flows, it jumps, it spins. And to top it all off, he does it at light speed!

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    While the piano, thanks to its ability to sound many tones at once, is the most likely instrument where solo music is concerned, it's by no means the only possible instrument. The composer that jumps to mind is J.S. Bach, who composed six suites for cello. Each suite starts with a Prélude, which is followed by several movements of "dance music." (In fact I remember watching Yo-Yo Ma's video collaboration with dancers for some of this music.)

    The uninitiated might think one cello playing might make for a very lonely sound, but there are various techniques string players can use to accompany themselves. They can bow multiple strings at once to produce chords, or bow a string and let it echo as they move on to other notes. Additionally, in quick passages, a clever composer like Bach can easily fool the human ear into thinking it's hearing a harmonic line.

    I've selected here the Prélude from the sixth suite. There aren't a lot of chords in this section, but the movement loses nothing from the lack. It shows off the magnificent range of the instrument; near growling at the lower registers and soaring at the high. I was totally floored when I heard the fantastic runs in the last third of this movement. Some musicologists think these suites were composed as exercises for cellists to improve their technique, and I can hear how they might think that. Well if these are practice pieces, I'm content to listen to them all day.

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    While solo music is primarily for keyboard players, concertos (works for an instrumental soloist with orchestral support) were written for a large variety of instruments. Clarinets, flutes, bassoons, harps, trumpets, strings of all sorts... you name it.

    Jean Sibelius is probably the best-known Finnish composer of art music. He was considered a bit of a hero by his countryfolk in his time (imagine that, an artist thought of as a hero!); at a time when his nation was struggling for independence, some of his works were treated like national anthems to the Finnish people.

    His violin concerto is one of my favourite works of this type. It's quite different from other concertos I like, which have obvious recognisable melodies. The first movement feels more like a painting than a musical work, with the soloist sweeping brushstrokes against a sonic canvas. The third has a very driven, even violent, rhythm, and is notoriously difficult to perform.

    I've selected here the second movement, which is probably the "easiest" to listen to. The solo violin line in the middle of the section illustrates one of the methods I alluded to in the Bach work from last week; the soloist bows multiple strings at once, producing two distinct musical lines. That passage always makes me think of someone climbing up a mountain, crying and raging against unfeeling Nature. It's a fitting image for the work: Sibelius trained for years to be a violinist, but never attained the level of skill necessary for it to become his profession.

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    Art music composers are often inspired by other artists' work. It's no surprise that Shakespeare was a source of inspiration for many. Romeo and Juliet was spun off into operas and ballets, as were many of his other plays.

    Felix Mendelssohn wrote some music for A Midsummer Night's Dream. The whole suite was composed over 16 years, but not due to any deficiency or laziness on Mendelssohn's part--he was a child prodigy on the order of Mozart. The overture was a standalone work he composed before he was 18; the rest of the suite was composed to accompany a performance of the play. (If you've ever been to a wedding in the western world, you've probably heard the Wedding March from this suite of music; it's usually used as the recessional for ceremonies, as opposed to processional music, which is usually from Wagner's Lohengrin.)

    The overture and the scherzo (often translated as "musical joke") are my favourite parts of this incidental music; I've selected here the scherzo. It has a frenetic quality to it--it's quite easy to imagine the fairies of Titania and Oberon's court flitting about causing mischief.

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    Oooooh I can play that game too!

    J.S. Bach vs. Sweetbox.

    Johannes Brahms vs. Carlos Santana.

    Eric Satie vs. Janet Jackson.

    I prefer the originals, but make no judgements on people who prefer the remixes. After all, the composers of old used folk melodies and stole/sampled from each other as well.

    In fact, art musicians have often gone the other way: taking pop music and playing it in classical style.

    Matt Haimovitz mimicking Jimi Hendrix's "Star Spangled Banner" on cello (Happy belated Fourth).

    Christopher O'Riley's solo piano take on Radiohead's "No Surprises."
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    After last week's diversions, I thought it might be interesting to briefly explore collaboration between art music performers and specialists in other genres, rather than just adaptations from one genre to another.

    L'Arpeggiata is classified as an early music group (somewhat of a catch-all term for music before the Baroque period starting in the 1600s). I've got three of their albums, and while there's no denying they use "early music" instruments that fell out of use, they do a lot of collaboration with artists of other genres. Aside from the straight art music stuff they do, they've put out discs with jazz influences and varous folk musics from Europe and South America.

    I know just the tiniest bit about fado, a Portuguese folk music style. It's typically (but not always), mournful; the examples I've heard are usually sung by a woman with a small acoustic guitar ensemble accompanying. Misia is apparently one of the more popular fadistas... here she's joined the aforementioned L'Arpeggiata. While I doubt some of the instruments in this track are typical fado instruments (harpsichord? trumpet?), the arrangement sounds completely natural.



    Code:
    Todas as noites um pagem         Every night a young page
    com voz linda e maviosa          with a sweet and tuneful voice
    ia render homenagem              would go to pay homage to
    a Marquesinha formosa            the beautiful Marchioness.
    		
    Mas numa noite de agoiro         But one fateful night,
    o Marquês fero e brutal	         the fierce and cruel Marquess
    naquela garganta de oiro         plunged a dagger
    mandou cravar um punhal	         into that golden throat.
    		
    E a Marquesa delirante           And by night on her balcony,
    de noite em seu varandim         out of her mind the Marchioness,
    pobre louca alucinante           poor, hallucinating woman,
    chorando, cantava assim:         would weep as she sang:
    		
    Óh minha paixão querida          Oh, my dear beloved,
    meu amor, meu pagem belo         my love, my handsome page,
    foge sempre minha vida           flee for ever, my life,
    deste maldito castelo            from this accursed castle.
    Lyrics courtesy of album's (Mediterraneo) liner notes.
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    Antonin Dvo?ák is a composer near and dear to me... it was his work which finally opened my ears to art music. When pop radio started boring me, I wandered over to public radio, and one of his pieces was playing. My immediate reaction was, "Hey, this stuff is worth listening to."

    Dvo?ák, Czech son of a butcher, is often called "the least neurotic of the Romantic composers," and it's entirely true. There's a thread of cheeriness running throughout his works. Much of his music incorporates folk melodies, both of his own Czech people and American Indians (he spent several years in New York as the head of a music school there).

    I wanted to post the slow movement from his Serenade for Winds, but couldn't find a good Youtube version of it (there was a good version with the last two movements, but both together were a bit long for what I'm trying to do with this thread), so instead here's something from the first set of his Slavonic Dances... one of the more upbeat and exciting ones to contrast with the fado from last week.
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    While I can see why some people like it classical music doesn't touch me it bores me and I would rather listen to nothing. At the ren faire i do,like some of the music but would rather listen to something that energizes me and makes me feel alive. Like last week at the KiSS concert or tonite with Alice and the Crüe


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    As Im a musician, Ive tried to get into classical music several times. I respect it as the beautiful masterpieces that they are, but it's not my cup of tea.

    Thalone, I say KUDOS to you sir for havin the balls to open up your heart and share music that gets you going, regardless what people think.

    Everyone knows what I listen to, it's in my title.

    However what very few people will admit, is they like a music that they wont admit to their friends. I never understood that. WHATEVER YOU LIKE... share it with the world, is what I say.

    ~~**~~

    Here's one of mine, on occasion - I'll turn back the clock to the 1950s, back when Elvis Presley roamed the big stage.

    In one of the great, great concerts of the 1950s, so rare in fact that the heartiest Elvis maniacs (which Im not) never heard of it.

    Elvis' benefit concert recorded at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, to aid of the USS Arizona Memorial Fund, for the service men who died there during the Japanese attack in 1941. A great cause, and the girls go bananas. The first true modern day rock star.

    If we have any Elvis fans in the playerbase ... Elvish Presley where ever you are.... please enjoy:



    01 - Elvis Arrives In Pearl Harbor Hawaii
    02 - Elvis Receives Honorary Award Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

    8.30pm - USS Arizona Memorial Show - Bloch Arena Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

    03 - Intro
    04 - Heartbreak Hotel
    05 - All Shook Up
    06 - (Now and Then There's) A Fool Such As I
    07 - I Got A Woman
    08 - Love Me
    09 - Introductions
    10 - Such A Night
    11 - Reconsider Baby
    12 - I Need Your Love Tonight
    13 - That's All Right
    14 - Don't Be Cruel
    15 - One Night
    16 - Are You Lonesome Tonight
    17 - It's Now or Never
    18 - Swing Down Sweet Chariot
    19 - Hound Dog
    Last edited by LeslieWest_GuitarGod; 07-20-2014 at 06:29 AM.

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  19. #19
    Hopeless Romantic dunklezhan's Avatar
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    About 20 years ago, (when I was merely 17, yeesh I feel old now) I saved a bunch of my Dad's vinyl from the trash when he was moving house.

    Included in this collection were some very important pop music milestones (e.g. all the beatles albums except sadly Sgt Pepper. Though I did get a numbered White album so I lived with it ), some brilliant comedy audios, and a bunch of random stuff I would not normally ever listen to (e.g. there was some earth wind and fire in there, which really isn't my scene) and also half a dozen 'classical' LPs and a couple of classic/pop crossovers.

    Those last two were a big part of the reason for saving this collection. One of the classical pieces was The Planets with a circa 1970s London Philharmonic. Taken as a whole piece (i.e. both sides of the LP played in the order intended) I think is one of the most wonderful, evocative pieces of music ever made. One of the crossovers was a Star Wars LP - essentially another London philharmonic performance, this time of the first Star Wars film soundtrack but with like disco percussion. I just wanted to hear that, the novelty attracted me!

    There was some other stuff in there by 'the greats' too (essentially there's a couple of beethovens and some of that Wagner bloke who you aren't supposed to like because the Nazi's liked him but who was in fact a complete genius so take my advice and ignore the haters if you want big loud grandiose 'epic' feeling classical).

    Beyond that, I personally prefer 'classical' when delivered as part of a movie soundtrack - I'm not a subtle guy, movie soundtracks tend to over emphasis the emotional journey, whereas 'pure' classical I'm afraid really does require some musical knowledge if you want to interpret/analyse the music as the composer intended. One could argue that you are better off in that case not knowing anything about music so you can find your personal interpretation without being led. As an entertainer (I entertain with songs but I would NOT call myself a musician) who struggles with making sure that his songs and music are easily interpretable, my tastes generally mirror that - I like the music I listen to to telegraph what its getting at so I don't have to think too much about it. I don't read 'literature' for the same reason - I want my spare time to be fun. I don't want to have to think the whole **** time, I spend all day at work thinking, and I am not interested in whether what I am doing is 'worthy'.

    But whatever your tastes, I find the whole classical thing completely awe inspiring (how do they write this stuff?!), and aside from my music teacher at school who was VERY old school, I have never ever met a classical music 'snob' so there really is no need to be 'afraid' of giving this stuff a listen.

    Now, if we want to talk snob culture, we probably ought to focus on people who claim to read 'literature', since not only can they not ever define what they mean (meaning its not a real thing as far as I'm concerned) but gosh don't those people wrinkle their nose if you say you like Sci Fi/Fantasy, or heaven forfend if, like me, you've read ****ens and a bunch of other greats and frankly, decided they weren't all that and I'd rather read some Peter F Hamilton. When I say things like that it's like watching a robot being given a logic loop problem to solve. All these complicated expressions cross over their faces and then they file it away as if you haven't said it, reset and carry on with their lives. Error... does not compute...


    Love that you're taking the time to maintain this thread, OP.

    Edit: Lol, the autocensor detected "D i c k e n s" as a swear... I should've used Steinbeck or someone as an example.
    Last edited by dunklezhan; 07-20-2014 at 07:11 AM.
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  20. #20
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    first of cudos to you for a nice thread.

    i listen to a wide, very wide, selection of music. there are some good
    pieces in all types of music from opera and clasical to drum and base,
    but for me personaly the music that moves me the most is delta blues.

    the stories, the pain and suffering told in the songs i listen to is
    amazing, well for me anyway.

    most people i know think its kind of wierd that a 50ish year old
    white boy from south england listens to the sounds of the delta
    but if it moves you it moves you.

    i just recently recieved a 8 track of songs from the chain gangs of the
    deep south and drove my familt nuts listening to it over and over. it is
    amazing.

    anyway enough of my ramblings, nice thread and may the music you listen
    to move you in the same way mine does.

    your friend sil

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