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  1. #1
    Community Member gaxpar's Avatar
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    Default Performance is critical to gamers

    Gamers rated the importance of various aspects of playing video games on a scale of 0-4, where 0 is not important and 4 is extremely important. In every country except Japan, fast performance is the most critical aspect of playing a video game, followed by simple gameplay, interesting storyline, and the ability to play offline.



    https://media.limelight.com/images/SOOG_2019_IMG29.PNG




    https://www.limelight.com/resources/...ing-2019/#perf

  2. #2
    Community Member gaxpar's Avatar
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    Default Hmmm

    Who would have though performance is THE MOST critical aspect of a game for gamers . Downloads speed and game fluidity .

    Man what a foreign concept .



    In the online gaming industry, an industry worth $134.9 billion according to gamesindustry.biz, user experience is king. Most games, regardless of genre or platform, are now expected to have an online multi-player component and that gaming experience is directly affected by a user’s network connection. But with 2.5 billion players spread across the globe, how are video game companies ensuring their product will work for everyone at the same time? Players are not going to continue playing a game that feels unstable or unfair, so for online gaming companies, it is imperative to understand how network limitations impact video game performance and how to work around them to guarantee a good user experience.


    Probably the most critical network issue affecting online video game performance is latency. With players connecting on a global scale, companies must find a way to compensate for each user’s varying degree of latency. For live action games like 1st person shooters or fighting and racing games it becomes especially important. At what point does the latency cause a user to experience lag? 20ms, 40ms, 60ms? Finding and working around that threshold is essential for upholding fair game play conditions. And what about bandwidth limitations? Does a player with higher bandwidth have a better gaming experience?

    When players log into online games, they are generally connected to one another via servers. An algorithm is then used to find the best suited opponents and team mates. Gaming companies must rigorously test their games to ensure they continue to perform equally well for players on all network types or write logic to strategically pair players together with similar network conditions to ensure a similar experience.

    Testing the affect different network conditions have on game play can be a long, arduous process. Besides the varying network types players may be connected by, the possible combination of impairments on each player’s connection like latency, jitter, and packet loss adds complexity to the situation. Plus, companies often need to test from geographic locations where they don’t currently have servers, forcing them to pay for co-location services.
    Last edited by gaxpar; 04-04-2021 at 06:23 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaxpar View Post
    Gamers rated the importance of various aspects of playing video games on a scale of 0-4, where 0 is not important and 4 is extremely important. In every country except Japan, fast performance is the most critical aspect of playing a video game, followed by simple gameplay, interesting storyline, and the ability to play offline.



    https://media.limelight.com/images/SOOG_2019_IMG29.PNG




    https://www.limelight.com/resources/...ing-2019/#perf
    Dude, if you are looking for game.performance you are playing the wrong video game. This game has been a mess for years and in the last year a train wreck. They know it and hear it endlessly. The only explanation is that they don't care.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justicesfury View Post
    This game has been a mess for years and in the last year a train wreck. They know it and hear it endlessly. The only explanation is that they don't care.
    A better explanation is that the systems that have been layered onto the game engine have combined to produce a level of complexity that causes problems to crop up intermittently from group to group and build to build.

    Having so many independent variables in play has prevented the developers from getting a firm grip on where the fault lines in the code lie.

    Until last year the server farm was an outsource that prevented the developers from getting a handle on where the breaks in the networking were occurring.

    SSG is in the process, having brought the servers back in house, of trying to nail down the points at which packets bunch up and cause what we see as lag.

    However see the first two points above for why it may not be as easy to correct as we all assume. Looking at one group at a time is unlikely to provide clear answers, because that group may or may not be full of builds contributing to the problem. In addition those groups may or may not consist of accounts with good latency vs average latency vs poor latency.

    Finally, it is indeed possible that there are one or more sources of lag that the player community see as indispensable in terms of enjoyment of play.

    It's not an easy fix by any means and it is possible that there is no fix available that is acceptable to the community.

    That's way off your idea that they just don't care. More likely is that fixing the lag is priority one but they have no clue how to do that.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Justicesfury View Post
    Dude, if you are looking for game.performance you are playing the wrong video game. This game has been a mess for years and in the last year a train wreck. They know it and hear it endlessly. The only explanation is that they don't care.
    Cordo said they are working on the lag, they even hired an outside team to investigate. So yeah they dont care......
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by adamkatt View Post
    Cordo said they are working on the lag, they even hired an outside team to investigate. So yeah they dont care......
    They hired the old executive producers of this game. If you think they are going to call themselves out for poor coding and mistakes from their tenure with DDO, you don't know/remember Fernando and Kate Paiz. They were terrible executive producers and their hiring is a huge grift. That's it.

  7. #7
    Community Member Chacka_DDO's Avatar
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    Of course, performance is most important, at the very latest you understand it instantly when really bad lag (aka server performance issues) hits you, then you see with lag the whole game experience is destroyed.
    Even more, a reason to get not tired to complain about bad server performance until this problem is mostly solved, of course, no one expects a 100% lag-free MMORPG (at last, not I) but it should be as lag-free as any possible.
    Currently, I'm ok with the situation but of course, on the hardcore server lag is even less tolerable fortunately I had no terrible lag in a really bad situation there so far.
    And I hope the next improvements to server performance will help even more with the lag situation
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  8. #8
    Community Member Alrik_Fassbauer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaxpar View Post
    Gamers rated the importance of various aspects of playing video games on a scale of 0-4, where 0 is not important and 4 is extremely important. In every country except Japan, fast performance is the most critical aspect of playing a video game, followed by simple gameplay, interesting storyline, and the ability to play offline.
    In eSports, maybe.

    To me, this only shows to me how much gamers have become so much focused on graphics that they neglect EVERYTHING ELSE.


    The numbers also show me how much people are NOTR interested in good stories. Games with good storries - espoecially Adventure Games like Monkey Island - have died out. Nobody would buy them, because they are too much story focused.

    The result are superflous, shallow games which are graphically looking good. With zero replay value.
    In the past, when I was visiting "second hand" game shops - before the Age Of Steam - action games were ALWAYS sold there. What I did NEVER see there, were story heavy games like Adventure games. Says a lot.

    Also, I find it extremely disturbing that no-one rates the ability to play games ofline as high. Heralds the age of " games / gamingas service", which is actually knocking at the door right now.
    "You are a Tiefling. And a Cleric, with the Domain of the Sun. Doesn't that contradict each other ?" "No, all my friends are playing evil. I found that so boring that I decided to be on the good side. And, besides, Sun and Fire, where is the difference, really ?"

  9. #9
    Community Member arminius's Avatar
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    DDO could end the lag by becoming a generic WoW clone. Put everyone's actions on a grid. No one has custom builds with synergies that never occurred to the devs. No one swings faster through their own actions. No one moves faster or jumps higher or does anything unsurprising or unpredictable at all. Run up to enemies, right click to auto attack, take a couple of bites from your sandwich, collect loot, run to next enemies, repeat for years/decades.

    DDO's lag is created by everything we love most about DDO. To kill it, you will have to lobotomize the patient. The devs know and understand this, and they are doing what they can to work around the edges of the problem, because they know if they killed the lag for real, DDO raison d'etre would be gone, and the patient would have to be euthanized.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by adamkatt View Post
    Cordo said they are working on the lag, they even hired an outside team to investigate. So yeah they dont care......
    Cordo also said we were getting a mega server. How did that work out?

  11. #11
    Community Member gaxpar's Avatar
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    Default The No. 1 Reason Gamers Will Quit , The market trends .

    What’s the No. 1 reason gamers will quit playing an online multiplayer game?

    To find out, INAP surveyed more than 200 gamers and game developers attending GDC 2019, held last month in San Francisco, finding that the two groups don’t exactly see eye to eye. Here’s what we learned about that and more.


    Low Lag Vs. Solid Gameplay: Which Matters More?

    Among gamers, the top three most common reasons for quitting an online game are high latency/lag (52 percent), followed by bad game mechanics/poor gameplay (43 percent) and poor matchmaking/not enough players (34 percent).



    https://www.inap.com/inap/wp-content...1-970x1024.png



    The Trifecta:


    Yet a majority of game developers we surveyed believe that the most common reason gamers would quit playing is bad game mechanics/poor gameplay (56 percent), trailed by high lag/latency (48 percent) and poor matchmaking/not enough players (46 percent).




    In fact, low latency is so crucial to online gamers that more than seven in 10 (72 percent) will play a laggy game for less than 10 minutes before quitting. And nearly three in 10 say what matters most about an online game is having a seamless gaming experience without lag.



    LOLZ Sure they are not PLAYING DDO right ?



    https://www.inap.com/inap/wp-content...2-977x1024.png



    https://www.inap.com/blog/top-reason...tiplayer-game/


    Welcome to the 8% of gamers that sticks to DDO no MATTER how much LAG there is even willing to play a permadeath character on a laggy server .

    Man im curious what % would play a permadeath with such laggy servers . Since only 8 % will put up with it forever how many of those 8 % would play permadeath 2 % ? 1% lol.

    Theyre all here SSG is is lucky its a niche laggy game and they have the customers for it . 72 % quit before 10 minutes of LAG let that sink in .


    Now research all you want all the studies amazon, Sony, Microsoft ... all have the same data accross the world, culture , languages ....
    Last edited by gaxpar; 04-05-2021 at 10:23 AM.

  12. #12
    Community Member Nugaot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alrik_Fassbauer View Post
    In eSports, maybe.

    To me, this only shows to me how much gamers have become so much focused on graphics that they neglect EVERYTHING ELSE.


    The numbers also show me how much people are NOTR interested in good stories. Games with good storries - espoecially Adventure Games like Monkey Island - have died out. Nobody would buy them, because they are too much story focused.

    The result are superflous, shallow games which are graphically looking good. With zero replay value.
    In the past, when I was visiting "second hand" game shops - before the Age Of Steam - action games were ALWAYS sold there. What I did NEVER see there, were story heavy games like Adventure games. Says a lot.

    Also, I find it extremely disturbing that no-one rates the ability to play games ofline as high. Heralds the age of " games / gamingas service", which is actually knocking at the door right now.
    Boy, reading comprehension isn't your strong suit, is it? The post you quoted is stating the exact opposite of that. Emphasis mine:

    Performance is critical to gamers
    Gamers rated the importance of various aspects of playing video games on a scale of 0-4, where 0 is not important and 4 is extremely important. In every country except Japan, fast performance is the most critical aspect of playing a video game, followed by simple gameplay, interesting storyline, and the ability to play offline.
    Nothing there mentions graphics at all. In fact, your post is the only one in this thread that mentions it even once!

  13. #13
    Community Member Dejvid's Avatar
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    i agree. performance, ie connectivity in multiplayer games, is paramount.

    dont care how bad the game looks. dont care if it has some bugs here and there. dont care if its monetization is predatory. (actually i do, but just for the argument)
    if the game grabs me, then theres only one thing it has to do to keep me as a customer.

    and that is, fullfill the job as a multiplayer game good. thats the only job. make it feel as natural as possible to play with others.
    but as soon as connectivity issues start, its not fullfilling its job. and at that point im not having fun, lose interest, and stop.

  14. #14
    Community Member Sarkastik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaxpar View Post
    Who would have though performance is THE MOST critical aspect of a game for gamers . Downloads speed and game fluidity .

    Man what a foreign concept .



    In the online gaming industry, an industry worth $134.9 billion according to gamesindustry.biz, user experience is king. Most games, regardless of genre or platform, are now expected to have an online multi-player component and that gaming experience is directly affected by a user’s network connection. But with 2.5 billion players spread across the globe, how are video game companies ensuring their product will work for everyone at the same time? Players are not going to continue playing a game that feels unstable or unfair, so for online gaming companies, it is imperative to understand how network limitations impact video game performance and how to work around them to guarantee a good user experience.


    Probably the most critical network issue affecting online video game performance is latency. With players connecting on a global scale, companies must find a way to compensate for each user’s varying degree of latency. For live action games like 1st person shooters or fighting and racing games it becomes especially important. At what point does the latency cause a user to experience lag? 20ms, 40ms, 60ms? Finding and working around that threshold is essential for upholding fair game play conditions. And what about bandwidth limitations? Does a player with higher bandwidth have a better gaming experience?

    When players log into online games, they are generally connected to one another via servers. An algorithm is then used to find the best suited opponents and team mates. Gaming companies must rigorously test their games to ensure they continue to perform equally well for players on all network types or write logic to strategically pair players together with similar network conditions to ensure a similar experience.

    Testing the affect different network conditions have on game play can be a long, arduous process. Besides the varying network types players may be connected by, the possible combination of impairments on each player’s connection like latency, jitter, and packet loss adds complexity to the situation. Plus, companies often need to test from geographic locations where they don’t currently have servers, forcing them to pay for co-location services.
    This is long and rambling. It sounds like a speech from a "guru" at a corporate training exercise. What is your point, and how does it relate to DDO? Are you trying to say the game is laggy and ought to be fixed?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaxpar View Post
    Who would have though performance is THE MOST critical aspect of a game for gamers?
    Ummm, anyone who know the basics of selling entertainment options to consumers?

    Also, failure of there to ever exist a "slow game" movement...?

  16. #16
    Community Member Sarkastik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaxpar View Post
    low latency is so crucial to online gamers that more than seven in 10 (72 percent) will play a laggy game for less than 10 minutes before quitting. And nearly three in 10 say what matters most about an online game is having a seamless gaming experience without lag.
    Then those 70% of gamers need to move over to chess.com right now. The performance is top notch.

    Quote Originally Posted by gaxpar View Post
    Welcome to the 8% of gamers that sticks to DDO no MATTER how much LAG there is even willing to play a permadeath character on a laggy server.
    Or, maybe, those 8% of gamers know that there are other qualities about the game that are more important than performance. Do a little deep dive, and you might figure out that that is why you're still playing it, too.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by gaxpar View Post
    Gamers rated the importance of various aspects of playing video games on a scale of 0-4, where 0 is not important and 4 is extremely important. In every country except Japan, fast performance is the most critical aspect of playing a video game, followed by simple gameplay, interesting storyline, and the ability to play offline.
    [...]
    Nice data, but 2019? Anything from the 2020 post pandemic?

    Also, isn't performance depends on what time you play? i.e. performance is critical during prime time US 6pm->11pm. If the player is an ICU doctor, nurse, nurse practitioner and might be working in the evening but home in the morning or never got home due to COVID... performance is less of a concern, since during wee hours it should be pretty good.

    If you got quests take says kill 10 rabbits, and then 10 wolves and then 10 chipmunks, and then DM says, "As a hunter, you hunting skills improved by one". You might as well blame the bad game play. DDO has something like this, but is hidden away in the Monster Manual; where you learn more about the monsters as you slay them and obtain bonus pet items.

    But DDO (D&D) is neither easy to play and it has dozens upon dozens of character class combinations.

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  18. #18

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    maybe during prime time allocated more computing power and resources, i.e. more vCPU, more RAM and more network bandwidth.

    For this point of view, fixing the memory bloat looks like a long term thingy... Haven't heard or see anything regarding the strategy or direction how the DDO team would solve this.

    With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

  19. #19
    Community Member Nugaot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrande View Post
    Also, isn't performance depends on what time you play? i.e. performance is critical during prime time US 6pm->11pm. If the player is an ICU doctor, nurse, nurse practitioner and might be working in the evening but home in the morning or never got home due to COVID... performance is less of a concern, since during wee hours it should be pretty good.
    As someone who typically plays during off peak hours, server performance is perhaps slightly better but not enough to be notable. Plus of course it is basically impossible to find a group to play with during these hours especially on the TR grind. The trade off between the two is kind of a rock and a hard place situation.

  20. #20
    Community Member Antheal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaxpar View Post
    What’s the No. 1 reason gamers will quit playing an online multiplayer game?
    Predatory microtransactions!

    Is it predatory microtransactions?

    I bet it's predatory microtransactions.
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