How many hours do you DDO a week?

How many hours do you DDO per week?

  • Less than 5 hours...

  • 5 to 10 hours per week.

  • 10 to 15 hours per week

  • 15 to 20 hours per week

  • 20 to 30 hours a week

  • 30 to 40 hours a week

  • 40 to 50 hours a week

  • I play DDO for more than 50 hours a week.


Results are only viewable after voting.

Buddha5440

Well-known member
Those that pride themselves on a TR every 1-3 days are looking at this like...'What? Highest option is only more than 50 hours per week'.
 

J1NG

I can do things others can't...
Between 35 and 70 hours a week. Sometimes more if time permits and nothing else requires my attention. Most of it is spent on experimenting inside DDO, for cinematics and testing. A lot less if on gaming inside itself.

J1NG
 

Elminster

Former Pollster, Beloved by the DDO Forums.
Between 35 and 70 hours a week. Sometimes more if time permits and nothing else requires my attention. Most of it is spent on experimenting inside DDO, for cinematics and testing. A lot less if on gaming inside itself.

J1NG
Understandable as you are our resident super-expert, literally know more than the Devs.
 

TavernBrawler

Well-known member
5-10 hours a week. I could play more but there is no end-game so between TR and reaper grind, other games take up my time.
 
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Br4d

Well-known member
I selected 10-15 but it was a coin flip between that and 5-10.

Ironically I likely played 20-30 hours a week up until 2016 or so with spikes up to 50 at times. I stopped playing DDO as my main game when the increasing grind destroyed my suspension of disbelief on reaching my goals on 4 characters.
 

Br4d

Well-known member
Just a few academic papers about Constitutional Law in the mid-90s, and an article for the periodical "Foreign Policy" back in 1986 or '87.

These are my first stabs at writing a novel. They may turn out to be novellas in the end, but we'll see.

Integrated novellas is the easiest way for a first-time writer to approach a large saga. If you get blocked or stuck in one part of the tale you can quickly switch gears and start working on other parts.

I strongly recommend writing a a structure document that briefly describes the story arc before working on the novel itself. It doesn't have to be much but it will help you when an interesting branch presents itself and you have to decide whether to go out on that branch or not.
 

Arkat

Founder & Super Hero
Integrated novellas is the easiest way for a first-time writer to approach a large saga. If you get blocked or stuck in one part of the tale you can quickly switch gears and start working on other parts.

I strongly recommend writing a a structure document that briefly describes the story arc before working on the novel itself. It doesn't have to be much but it will help you when an interesting branch presents itself and you have to decide whether to go out on that branch or not.
I've written a brief outline in 4 or 5 pages of a small notebook for one of my stories, but I am unfamiliar with the term "structure document." "Integrated novella" is also a new term for me.

I will have to look these up.

Thanks.

EDIT: Do you perhaps mean a "structured document"?
 

Grimstad

Well-known member
Been in the game for years, but recently retired. Now playing ~35 or so hours a week and learning a lot. It still takes me a couple of weeks to TR, but I'm getting faster as I learn the quests and how to zerg fast and hard. Going for my first completionist.
 
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